U.S. Army Medical Department, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center
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Radiology


Location:
Bldg 3711, Room G117

DSN Phone:
590-5280

CIV Phone:
06371-9464-5280

Hours:
Mondays - Fridays (Except Holidays)
7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Ultrasound
General Information:

The LRMC ultrasound Department performs diagnostic Ultrasound studies under current American College of Radiology guidelines.

Diagnostic ultrasound is an established, effective diagnostic ultrasound technique that uses high-frequency sound waves for both anatomic and Color/Power/Spectral Doppler evaluation.

The applications of diagnostic ultrasound technology include but are not limited to:

1. Obstetrical and gynecological ultrasound
2. Thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic ultrasound
3. Renal and retroperitoneal ultrasound
4. Vascular ultrasound (carotid, abdominal, deep
vein thrombus)
5. Evaluation of superficial structures and small
parts such as breast, thyroid, testicle and skin

The performing technologist cannot give exam results or medical advice. All exams are supervised and interpreted by radiologists. Please direct questions concerning your diagnosis to your referring physician.

Patient Examination Preparation:

Please arrive 10 minutes prior to scheduled appointment time. You may be rescheduled if you are more than 15 minutes late for your appointment. If you cannot keep your appointment, please notify us as soon as possible. You may reschedule over the phone.

• Children are not allowed in the examination room
unless they are the patient.
• No pictures or videos may be obtained in the
ultrasound exam rooms.

Hourly care is provided at the Landstuhl Child Development Center (Phone 06371-86-7350 or DSN 486-7350) by appointment. However your child must be registered with central enrollments located on Pulaski Barracks (Phone 0631-3406-4122 or DSN 493-4122).

Exam Instructions:

Pelvic Ultrasound - This is a 2-part exam (abdominal and vaginal) that will last approximately 45 minutes. A full bladder is required for the first half of the exam. The second part of the exam, which is performed vaginally, can be performed even if menstruating. If you are uncomfortable with this, we can reschedule you after the completion of your cycle. Both parts will be performed during your appointment. If exam preparation is insufficient, we may have to reschedule your appointment. No visitors are allowed for this exam.

Abdominal and Aortic Ultrasound - For optimal abdominal and aortic ultrasound studies, do not eat, drink, smoke or chew gum for 8 hours prior to the examination. Failure to follow these instructions may result in an inadequate study or rescheduled appointment.
Medications can be taken with a small amount of water. If you must take the medication with food, please contact us prior to your examination.

Abdominal Ultrasound - This is a study of your liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys and spleen. This exam will last approximately 30 minutes. See exam prep above.

Aortic Ultrasound - This is a study of your aorta. This exam will last approximately 30 minutes. See exam prep above.

Renal Ultrasound - This is a study of your kidneys and bladder. This exam will last approximately 30 minutes. A full bladder is required for this exam. Drink 24 oz. of fluid prior to appointment. Do not empty your bladder until your exam is complete.

Thyroid Ultrasound - This is a study of the thyroid gland at the base of the neck. The exam lasts approximately 30 minutes. There is no preparation for this exam.

Testicular Ultrasound - This is a study of the tissue composition of the testes. The exam will last approximately 30 minutes. There is no preparation for this exam.

Carotid Ultrasound - This is a study of the internal and external carotid arteries in your neck. The exam will last approximately 60 minutes. There is no preparation for this exam.


DVT (Deep Venous Thrombosis) - This is a study of the deep veins in either the arms or legs. This exam will last approximately 30 minutes. There is no preparation for this exam.

Other: small parts, muscular parts, superficial, pylorus, heads (infants) etc. - Instructions will be given accordingly.

OB Anatomy Scan - This is a study performed between 20-24 weeks gestation. The purpose of this examination is to evaluate fetal anatomy development. Anatomy evaluated include: heart, spine, kidneys, head, extremities, cervix, placenta and vascular flow of the fetal organs. Up to three pictures may be printed for you. Gender images are not provided. Video recording or personal media device use is not permitted during ultrasound exam. This exam lasts approximately 60 minutes. A full bladder is required for this examination. Drink 32 oz. (1 liter) of fluid one hour prior to your scheduled exam. No children are allowed in the room. One adult visitor may be present during scan.

Mammography Operational hours:
Mondays through Fridays (except Holidays & Training Holidays)
7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

General Information:

The Mammography Clinic at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center operates one state of the art digital mammography unit. Mammography imaging provides screening & diagnostic evaluations of the breast. We provide mammography imaging services to eligible beneficiaries in the U.S. European Command region as well as Wounded Warriors deployed to Afghanistan and other remote areas within our region of responsibility. Due to this unique mission of caring for our Wounded Warriors and high demand, we are forced to prioritize examinations as follows:

1. Wounded Warriors
2. Inpatients
3. Active Duty members
4. Active Duty family members
5. Retirees, VA beneficiaries
6. Other eligible members

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q1: My exam was ordered today, why can’t I schedule my appointment?
A: All orders are reviewed daily by a Radiologist, and the appropriate protocol is prescribed to answer your specific health problem. As some exams take longer than others, we want to ensure we have enough time to complete your evaluation. We ask that you provide at least one full business day for this to occur. Occasionally, the Radiologist must discuss your case with your Doctor, and this may take additional time.

Q2: Are walk-in examinations available?
A: All Mammography exams must be scheduled. We do not currently have walk in appointments.

Q3: Why do I have to come to my appointment 15 minutes early?
A: This is critical to ensure there is sufficient time to complete the mammography paperwork and to make sure we have the correct exam ordered.

Q4: What if I cannot arrive to my appointment on time?
A: You should call as soon as possible. This will allow us to try and switch your time with someone else. If you do not inform the front desk, and you do not arrive within 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment, your appointment will have to be re-scheduled. Our appointments are only 15 minutes long, and if you arrive 15 minutes late you are the next person's appointment time.

Q5: What if my examination slot is given to someone else?
A: You will have to reschedule on a different day unless we have a cancelation. Then we may be able to see you at a later time.

Q6: Is there anything special I need to do to prepare for my exam?
A: Yes, thanks for asking. On the day of your mammogram, please do not wear any deodorant, powders or perfume. This can show up on your mammogram and may cause us to have to repeat your exam.

Q7: What can I expect on the day of my examination?
A: Your screening form will be reviewed and you will have to change into an exam gown. Immediately prior to the mammogram, the technologist will provide an explanation of the mammogram process. You will be asked to remove any deodorant if you have happened to wear any. Once the exam is done, you will able to leave if you are having a screening mammogram (15-minute long appointment) and your doctor will be notified of the results and a letter sent to you within 30 days. If you are having a diagnostic mammogram, this appointment can take up to 2 hours and you will receive the results the same day of the exam.

Q8: What happens during my examination?
A: Your breast will be placed on a plate and compressed to acquire a diagnostic quality image. Each breast is imaged 2 times in different angles.

Q9: How long does an examination typically last?
A: Usually about 15 minutes is the maximum for a screening mammogram. For diagnostic mammograms, which is usually accompanied by a breast ultrasound, they can take up to 2 hours.

Q10: Is there anything else important I should know about during my examination?
A: The two most important things for you to remember are being perfectly still and letting the technologist know if there is anything wrong or anything concerning you.

Q11: I came to my appointment on time, but my examination was delayed, why?
A: Fortunately, this is the exception. However, if this happens to you, we apologize and thank you for your patience. This rare event happens for one of two main reasons: A mechanical or maintenance concern, or an emergency request for another patient.

Q12: What if I’m pregnant or think I might be pregnant?
A: We do not examine pregnant women unless there is an urgent need. If you think you are pregnant, please let us know. The Radiologist will discuss your case with your Doctor to decide how to proceed and what the alternatives are.

Q13: What if I’m breastfeeding?
A: If you are breastfeeding we will not do a mammogram, but instead do an ultrasound if you are in need of a diagnostic mammogram. If you are only needing a screening mammogram, we will not be able to perform a screening mammogram until 6 months after you have stopped breastfeeding. If the radiologist decided to do a mammogram on you while you are breastfeeding, you may continue to breastfeed normally after your examination.

Q14: How and when do I get my results?
A: The results are sent electronically to your Doctor. For routine examinations, this process usually takes 1-2 normal business days and you will be sent a results letter within 30 days of your exam.

Q15: Why do I need to bring my prior examination film or discs and my results?
A: This is very important to see how your breast tissue has changed from year and year and will assist the radiologist in determining if you need additional imaging or possibly a biopsy.


Nuclear Medicine
Location:
Bldg 3762/Ward 6B (ground floor)

Phone:
DSN 486-7318
Civilian Phone: 06371-86-7318

Hours of Operation:
Mondays through Fridays (Except Holidays)
7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

General Information:

What is Nuclear Medicine?
Nuclear Medicine technologists use safe, painless and cost-effective techniques to image the body and treat disease. Nuclear Medicine imaging is unique because it provides doctors with information about both structure and function. It is a way to gather medical information that would otherwise be unavailable, require surgery, or necessitate more expensive diagnostic tests. Nuclear Medicine imaging procedures often identify abnormalities very early in the progress of a disease long before many medical problems are apparent with other diagnostic tests.

Nuclear Medicine uses very small amounts of radioactive materials (radiopharmaceuticals) to diagnose and treat disease. In imaging, the radiopharmaceuticals are detected by special types of cameras that work with computers to provide very precise pictures about the area of the body being imaged. In treatment, the radiopharmaceuticals go directly to the organ being treated.

How safe are Nuclear Medicine procedures?
Nuclear medicine procedures are among the safest diagnostic imaging exams available. To obtain diagnostic information, a patient is given a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical. Because such a small amount is used, the amount of radiation received from a nuclear medicine procedure is comparable with that received during a diagnostic X-ray. The nuclear medicine team will carefully perform the most appropriate examination for the patient’s particular medical problem and thereby avoid any unnecessary radiation exposure.

The Mission:
The Nuclear Medicine department provides excellent Patient-Centered Healthcare to patients of all ages, for Active Duty and Reserve Personnel, Military Retirees, Family Members and Wounded Warriors.

The procedures performed in Nuclear Medicine include:

• Myocardial Perfusion studies
• Genitourinary studies
• Endocrine studies (screening and ablation)
• Respiratory studies
• Musculoskeletal studies
• Gastrointestinal studies
• Brain Perfusion studies
• Sentinel Lymph Node analysis
• I-123 MIBG imaging
• Octreoscan imaging
• Lymphedema analysis
• Spect Fusion Imaging
• Densitometry (dexa) studies

Upon scheduling, you will be given a paper with very detailed instructions. Depending on the type of exam, Nuclear Medicine procedures usually take a minimum of 1 to 72 hours.

Patient Examination Preparation:

Please arrive 10 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment time. You may be rescheduled if you are more than 15 minutes late for your appointment. If you cannot keep your appointment, please notify us at least 24 hours in advance. You may reschedule over the phone.

Nuclear Medicine patients become radioactive after being dosed, therefore we are not able to share our waiting room with other departments. Pregnant family members and young children are not allowed to wait in the Nuclear Medicine waiting room and must be directed to the radiology waiting room.


Computed Tomography

General Information:

The Computed Tomography or CT clinic at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center operates t. MRI imaging and provides diagnostic evaluations of a wide variety of medical conditions and injuries without the use of radiation. We provide MRI imaging services to eligible beneficiaries in the U.S. European Command region as well as Wounded Warriors deployed to Afghanistan and other remote areas within our region of responsibility. Due to this unique mission of caring for our Wounded Warriors and high demand, we are forced to prioritize examinations as follows:

1. Wounded Warriors
2. Inpatients
3. Active Duty members
4. Active Duty family members
5. Retirees, VA beneficiaries
6. Other eligible members

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: How does CT work?
A: CT is one of many different modalities within a radiology department that provides a diagnostic imaging service. Similar to X-ray, CT uses ionizing radiation to produce images. CT is capable of not only imaging bone but many of the soft tissues of your body as well. Depending on your specific medical history, CT may be the most appropriate type of diagnostic/medical imaging. Often times, CT can be confused with MRI because of the similar appearance of the two sections’ machines.

Q: My exam was ordered today. Why can’t I schedule my appointment?
A: All orders are reviewed daily by a radiologist, and the appropriate CT exam is approved/selected based on your specific medical history. As some exams take longer than others, we want to ensure we have enough time to complete your evaluation. We ask that you provide at least one full business day for this to occur. Occasionally, the Radiologist must discuss your case with your Doctor, and this may take additional time.

Q: Are walk-in CT examinations available?
A: All CT examinations are conducted on a referral basis by an order from your Doctor. Occasionally we have cancellations and may have space available.

Q: Why do I have to come to my appointment X minutes early?
A: There are a variety of reasons why we may ask you to come early to your CT exam appointment. Depending on the specific CT exam that is ordered for you, we may ask you to come in early to pick up oral contrast that will need to be consumed prior to your CT exam or to have a metabolic panel processed by the LRMC Outpatient Laboratory. Additionally, a CT technologist will conduct a pre-scan consent and questionnaire with you before beginning the exam.

Q: What is “oral contrast” and how do I know if I am required to consume it before my CT exam?
A: Oral contrast is a liquid solution that is drunk in a specific manner before your CT appointment. Oral contrast is usually consumed before an abdominal CT exam. To put it simply, the oral contrast allows the physicians who will view the images of your CT exam to better visualize the soft tissues of your digestive tract. When you call to schedule your CT examination, one of our scheduling personnel will inform you if you will be required to drink oral contrast prior to your CT exam.

Q: Are there any side effects from drinking this oral contrast?
A: In general, no. Oral contrast is processed through your digestive tract in a similar manner as food and water. Occasionally, the oral contrast can cause light to mild nausea but this is uncommon. Please ask your healthcare provider if you would like to know more about this topic.

Q: How do I obtain the oral contrast if I am required to drink it before my CT exam?
A: Once we have confirmed that oral contrast is required for your CT exam, you can stop by the radiology scheduling desk to obtain paperwork to pick up the oral contrast. This paperwork also includes specific instructions on how to consume the oral contrast. You will take the paperwork to the outpatient pharmacy and pick up the oral contrast there. This can be done at any point before your scheduled CT exam.

Q: My provider told me that I would or might be receiving “IV Contrast” for my CT. What is that?
A: IV Contrast is a solution that is somewhat similar to the oral contrast mentioned above. It is an iodine based substance used as a material to help us visualize many different blood vessels and soft tissues in the area of your body being examined. IV contrast is administered by an injection into one of the veins of your arms.

Q: Are there any health concerns with receiving IV contrast?
A: There are several medical conditions that can conflict with the administration of CT IV contrast. Before any exam where IV contrast is administered, a CT tech will ask you a series of questions about these medical conditions to ensure that you can safely receive the contrast. We may also ask you to have a blood sample taken and processed by the LRMC Lab prior to your scheduled CT exam to ensure your safety.

Q: I’ve heard that it’s possible to have an allergic reaction to CT IV contrast. Is this true?
A: Yes, it is possible to have an allergic reaction to the CT IV contrast; however, it is very uncommon. In the unlikely event that you do have an allergic reaction, it is usually a mild reaction such as itching or minor swelling of tissue around the IV. The American College of Radiology has found that severe allergic reactions only occur in approximately 1 out of every 10,000 patients. Our CT staff is trained on the course of actions to take to quickly administer medication should you suffer from an allergic reaction.
Important: If you know that you have an allergy to CT IV contrast from a previous examination, PLEASE INFORM YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER. Your healthcare provider will consult with Radiology to determine the proper course of action, and, if necessary, pre-medicate you before undergoing the CT examination.

Q: I will be receiving both oral and IV contrast for my exam. Why do I need both?
A: In many different CT examinations, both type of contrast are used to enhance the imaging for the area of your body that is being scanned. This is very common and each type of contrast serves a specific purpose to enhance the CT images.

Q: Should I be concerned if I have any metal surgical hardware in my body?
A: CT machines do not utilize any magnetic waves/magnetism to acquire images. Surgical hardware or devices will not affect your CT examination.

Q: What if I cannot arrive to my appointment on time?
A: You should call as soon as possible. This will allow us to try and switch your time with someone else. If you do not inform the front desk, and you do not arrive within 15 minutes prior to your scheduled appointment, your slot may be given to someone else.



Q: What if my examination slot is given to someone else?
A: We will attempt to provide you with an alternate slot the same day, although another same-day slot may not be available. Also, keep in mind that this slot may be much later in the day. Otherwise, you will have to reschedule on a different day.

Q: Is there anything special I need to do to prepare for my exam?
A: To minimize delay time and expedite your scan, it is advised to wear clothing that does not contain any metal (zippers, buttons, jewelry, etc.) over the area of your body that will be examined. If you are unable to do this, you may be asked to change into a gown or scrubs provided by the CT section. Additionally, if it has been confirmed that you will be receiving either oral or IV contrast (or both) we ask that you do not eat anything more than a light snack during the two hours leading up to your scheduled CT exam.

Q: What can I expect on the day of my examination?
A: Approximately 15 minutes prior to your examination, a CT technologist will conduct a brief questionnaire with you regarding your medical history. Once the pre-exam questionnaire is complete, the technologist will proceed with the CT examination. If your CT exam requires the administration of IV contrast, the CT technologist will place an IV in a suitable vein in one of your arms before starting the exam.

Q: What happens during my examination?
A: You will be placed onto the CT machine’s table and moved into the CT Gantry, a circular “donut-shaped” machine that acquires the CT images. The table will quickly move you in then out of the machine to acquire a pre-scan “scout image” or X-ray of the general area of the body that is about to be scanned. At this point, if IV contrast is required, it will be administered through the arm IV placed immediately before the examination. The IV contrast typically takes about 20 to 60 seconds to be injected into your bloodstream, at which point you will pass through the gantry one final time while it acquires the CT images.

Q: How long does an examination typically last?
A: An average CT exam (not including the pre-exam preparations) lasts between 3 to 10 minutes.

Q: What if I am getting more than one body part examined on one day?
A: In most cases, this is not an issue. CT examinations of different body parts can usually be performed together or back to back with no complications. There are uncommon instances where multiple CT exams of different parts of the body cannot be performed at the same time or same day.

Q: Is there anything else important that I should be aware of during my examination?
A: The two most important things for you to remember are lying perfectly still and letting the technologist know if there is anything wrong or anything concerning you.


Q: I came to my appointment on time, but my examination was delayed, why?
A: Fortunately, this is the exception. However, if this happens to you, we apologize and thank
you for your patience. This rare event happens for one of two main reasons: a mechanical or maintenance concern, or an emergency request for another patient.

Q: How and when do I get my results?
A: The results are sent electronically to your Doctor. For routine examinations, this process usually takes 1-2 normal business days.

Q: Why do I need to bring my prior examination film or discs and my results?
A: This is very important to see how your medical condition has changed. Also, if this is done prior to your exam being done, we can review your prior examination and specialize your current examination if needed.